• Literature+Fiction

    The Last Colour: Fiction by Vikas Khanna

    Most often the simplest of dishes give out the best of flavors. Chef Vikas Khanna’s first fiction is sort of similar to this. The Last Colour, published by Bloomsbury, may well be a simple tale, of a relationship between a young tight rope walker and a middle aged widow. Yet the book brings out in abundance emotions- the longing of the heart and the impact of social bias. Vikas Khanna…

  • Non Fiction & Auto-Biographies

    Book Review: Immortal India by Amish

    The Shiva Trilogy followed by the Ramchandra series, has surely catapulted Amish to the list of popular Indian writers. He has come a long way, from his days as a debut writer with Immortals of Meluha. Today, Amish could be found on the invite list of almost all literary events. He is a public speaker and his opinions are sought in many forums across the country. Immortal India is his…

  • Non Fiction & Auto-Biographies

    Remnants of a Separation by Aanchal Malhotra

    Isn’t a book jacket a crucial element, when choosing a book? “Remnants of a Separation” by Aanchal Malhotra boasts of one such book cover- a beautiful integration of title and image. And beyond doubt, it persuaded me to get started on a reading experience. I wasn’t left disappointed. It is a book that speaks volumes on partition, its effects with the passage of time, family ties and loss. Partition as…

  • Literature+Fiction

    Book Review: A State of Freedom by Neel Mukherjee

    Desire and need, may well seem to be the two sides of the same coin. A State of Freedom by Neel Mukherjee, explores these complexities through five different characters, in five different circumstances. Reflections of contemporary India, these lives have an unquenchable thirst for a better life, as they push themselves beyond mere existence. Neel Mukherjee’s earlier published books include Past Continuous in India, which won the Crossword Prize. His second…

  • Books-U Write I Say,  Literature+Fiction

    Book Review: The Ministry of Utmost Happiness- Arundhati Roy

    I wasn’t all that sure if I should actually pick Arundhati Roy’s latest- The Ministry of Utmost Happiness. The reasons were plenty. Firstly, despite all the acclaim and the Booker Prize, I hadn’t entirely enjoyed reading her first book – The God of Small Things. Secondly, her so called liberal opinions expressed on many occasions, on all things Indian, just didn’t go down well with me. And lastly, in just over…

  • Gender Parity,  Popcorn Zone

    Harassment to Women- Dowry Deaths

    The news about the tragic death of Manjula Davek was doing the rounds on social media. All of 28 years, the young PhD student had been found hanging in her hostel room in IIT Delhi. It quite was disturbing to read about it. Here was a girl on the verge of completing her research from the country’s premier institute, having published papers in international journals. A girl of high intellect…

  • Popcorn Zone

    Ajanta Caves- Art Beyond Imagination

    It was the summer of 1819. Captain John Smith, a young Cavalry Officer, along with a party of British hunters, was tracking down a tiger. In the thick forest of Aurangabad in Maharashtra, the animal’s footprints led them straight past a cavity in a rock face. They soon found themselves in front of a manmade façade, cut into the rock face. As the hunting party slowly made its way inside,…

  • Popcorn Zone

    Road From Delhi to Wagah-Attari Border

    The Wagah Border gate may seem just like any other gate. Situated on NH1, it is partly built on the Grand Trunk Road which is one of the longest and oldest highways of India. The road extends up to Kabul in Afghanistan and still remains as a major trade route between both the countries. Interestingly, Wagah is a village in Pakistan, which shares the boundary with our border village Attari.…