How many extra curricular activities is your child in?

The park seemed to wear a dismal look. I couldn’t hear the sound of squealing children, nor did I spot a doting parent or a loving grandparent at the bench. Except for a child or so, this park in an upscale South Delhi Colony bore a deserted look. I found a comfortable spot, and as I sat, watching my two little girls do the monkey bars and climb up and down the slides a zillion times, a young mother I knew came by. It had been weeks since I had bumped into her or her seven year old daughter. On enquiring she told me how busy life was for her and her little girl. Coming to the park was out of question because the child was busy attending evening classes to learn swimming, tennis, gymnastics, karate, chess, drawing, Odishi dance and classical music.

Yes, you read it all right. The child stays busy through the week including weekends!

Gone are the days, when evenings are spent playing with neighbors and friends at the local park or kicking ball at an empty ground in the locality. In a metro such as Delhi, there are issues of sorts that push the child indoors after school. Space constraints, safety concerns, plus the busy lifestyle of parents are a few of the reasons. Not to forget the shrinking size of the family, with no companion whatsoever for the child at home, and the growing menace of hand held gadgets in our daily lives. Parents thus, find it easier, to pack a child’s day with structured activities of sorts, keeping them not only occupied (presumably productive) but also away from television and technology. Big cities today sport classes of every kind. From ballet, to piano, sketching to tennis, Bollywood dance classes to gymnastics, name it and you would find them around. Centres running these classes are open to young students on almost all days of the week.

Such activities of music, dance, dramatics and sports surely do wonders to a child’s self-confidence. And when you give them a chance to learn them outside school, it’s also another opportunity to make new friends. Much as I acknowledge this fact and also admire parents who dedicate their evenings ricocheting between classes, I prefer not subjecting myself (and my child) to many activities.

I must confess though, that this decision of mine has many a times made me feel inadequate. There is this constant Fear of Missing Out, as I see parents around ferrying children for various activities. Probably that’s what pushes many other parents too. But I constantly make an effort to remind myself that what best I can do is just equip my child with a bit of extra skills, to help raise his confidence. I cannot over-schedule his life, not yet.

And that truly raises a valid question- How many is too many?

Balance is the key

Each child is different and, has his own pace to learn, develop interests and pursue passions. It pays to not push him beyond his comfort level and, allow him to discover interests on his own. Give him that blank space in his daily time table, to dream, breathe and explore the world around. Strike a balance- between free playtime and the exposure to learn something new.

*Featured Image: Pixabay

4 comments

  1. Oh, yeah. I agree with you. We should give the child some time to breathe and dream. To boost his confidence and not to overburden. Loved your article, Ramya.
    Kohl Eyed Me
    Something’s Cooking

  2. I hear what you’re saying. In nuclear families like ours especially, where there’s only one kid, it pays to strike a balance between structured activities and free play. One lets you understand how to use the time given for an activity while the other lets you enjoy play and also builds negotiation skills and interpersonal skills. I’m not saying classes are bad but an overdose of them can surely cause a negative impact.

    Over scheduling can be harmful in the long run but I’ve actually seen kids who thrive on having multiple classes. All we can do is hope that our kids grow up well adjusted and happy and do it the best way we can.

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