Category

  • History, Mythology+Fantasy

    Historical Fiction: Painter to the King by Amy Sackville

    In a constant quest to read something different, my eyes have been wandering about trying to pick up different titles. These days I have been picking up the not so popular ones, across genres from different parts of the globe. Though I may often not really find the plot completely palatable, I have begun to appreciate the books for various other aspects. I have begun to notice the varied writing styles adapted by authors, each with their own uniqueness. A recent book I read- Painter to the King- was a book from across the globe. Written by Amy Sackville, it was recommended by my favorite bookstagrammer. Not sure if it…

  • Literature+Fiction

    Classics- Love Them or Hate Them?

    These are books written years ago- of people in times of war and misery. These books have stories of innocent romance and tales of bravery too. There are adventures on the sea and tales of treasures discovered. Yet, classics aren’t a favorite pick of most book lovers. They are considered to be boring, difficult to understand and have a tendency to put one to sleep. I don’t disagree with any of these points. In fact, many such classics have worked as a lullaby on nights when sleep eluded me. However, slowly and steadily I have managed to transform my dislike into passion. Reasons to pick up classics In our fast…

  • Literature+Fiction

    Five Easy Classics for Beginner Readers

    Classics have their own charm. Despite most book lovers avoiding classics, I still consider them a great option when you want stories with a whole lot of depth. If you are beginner reader and are looking for easy classics to get started off, here are five popular choices. These books have a great story and also are easy on the narration. Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson This is the story of young David. Set in mid-18th century, the orphaned and penniless David is out seeking his last living relative- his Uncle Ebenezer. In this quest, David faces one misfortune after another. He escapes a murder, before being kidnapped and imprisoned…

  • Mystery, Thriller+Suspense

    Seven Mysteries to Thrill You Over the Week!

    Fast paced and edge of the seat kinds, mystery and thriller novels are a great way to break a monotony of sorts. They keep you engrossed in your reading, keep you guessing and pump up your heart beat. Here are a few of them that come with oodles of suspense and thrill. Private Delhi By Ashwin Sanghi & James Patterson The former CIA agent Jack Morgan runs an investigation agency called “Private”. With branches around the globe, the agency, investigates intriguing cases, with utmost discretion. They possess an incredible team of investigators, and boast of the latest technology and forensics to crack cases and get to the perpetrators. Continuing in…

  • Non Fiction & Auto-Biographies

    Five Non Fiction Books To Read This Summer

    If you seek something beyond that fiction pile of yours, here is a list of non-fiction narratives to satisfy your reading urges. Not too heavy and yet with a depth of its own kind, these non-fiction books would make a great read this summer. A Brief History of Humankind By Yuval Noah Harari 70,000 years of human existence- yes that’s how long we have been around. But wait, before you think, here is another history/sociology/ biology book, let me make it clear. Sapiens is a book that would get you thinking. It is a book that triggers imagination, piques curiosity. From the beginning of the human race, our life over…

  • Mystery, Thriller+Suspense

    Book Review- Calling Sehmat by Harinder Sikka

    The movie Raazi hit the theatres last Friday, and has been garnering a considerable amount of positive reviews. It is an adaptation of Harinder Sikka’s Calling Sehmat, a fictitious account of a supposedly real spy. I watched the movie this evening. But before I did that, I obviously had to read the book. Let me make a point clear at the onset. This post isn’t a comparison between the movie and the book. I don’t intend to pass a judgment on which one is better. The book and the movie are good in their own way and need to be looked at independently. The only thing they share in common…