Book Review Ghachar Ghochar by Vivek Shanbhag-Translated by Srinath Perur

It’s all Ghachar Ghochar!! I must confess. I have always resisted books that have been translated. When a book is rewritten as a translation from another language, somewhere the true essence of the story is lost. But here is a book that proved me wrong. Ghachar Ghochar is a fascinating book originally written in Kannada by Vivek Shanbhag and translated into English by Srinath Perur. Different from the currently trending Indian writing in English, in just around 30,000 words, it holds a story that has been so well told. Ghachar Ghochar is seemingly a novella in its truest sense, but

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Three Thousand Stitches By Sudha Murty

The weekend that passed by was quite a boring one, as I spent my time alone at home. The kids had a weekend getaway at a friend’s place, and the spouse was out at work. Having nothing much to do, and not in a frame of mind for a heavy read, I picked up Three Thousand Stitches by Sudha Murty. I had seen the book listed in the non-fiction category in the HT Nelson top 10 list. And, having read Sudha’s earlier books, it seemed to be the perfect read for the lazy weekend. Sudha Murty’s stories have always been inspiring,

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City of Djinns By William Dalrymple #writebravely

“For all its faults we love this city”-  William Dalrymple, City of Djinns: A Year in Delhi I have lived in Delhi for 3 years. Despite, the city being harsh in many a ways, there is something in this city that has won over my heart. The weekend was spent reading William Dalrymple’s “City of Djinns – A year in Delhi”. The book kindled a nostalgic feeling within me, of the days I spent there, my trips to the old city, the cycle rickshaw rides and the people so very unique to this place. Heard of Tughlakabad? Or want to know about

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Book Announcement: The Origin by Dan Brown

The author of The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown, is back again with his new book. Titled, The Origin, it would be the fifth installment in the Robert Langdon series. Primarily set in Spain, the book seems to be, yet again a paradoxical interplay between religion and science. Almost all his books have a similar central plot. And of course, in typical Dan Brown style, expect a whirlwind tour of the beautiful place, all with the Guggenheim Museum and Bilbao city in Northern Spain.  Critics have seldom been kind with Dan Brown’s books, yet it is no denying that his books have been best

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What’s Your Reading Pattern? #writebravely

Like many bibliophiles, beginning every New Year, I set ambitious goals to complete reading a certain number of books by the end of the year. And like many other resolutions, this goal too mostly stays an unaccomplished one. I must confess here, that this could be attributed to my sheer in-consistence in reading pattern. It of course could well be argued that reading requires no specific pattern. Or, for that matter even a goal. Reading must be purely for the joy of it. However, this truly does not hold good for a self-proclaimed book lover such as me. I am

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Remnants of a Separation by Aanchal Malhotra

Isn’t a book jacket a crucial element, when choosing a book? “Remnants of a Separation” by Aanchal Malhotra boasts of one such book cover- a beautiful integration of title and image. And beyond doubt, it persuaded me to get started on a reading experience. I wasn’t left disappointed. It is a book that speaks volumes on partition, its effects with the passage of time, family ties and loss. Partition as we know it Post- independence from the British Raj, the country was divided into two separate entities- India and Pakistan. A major population exchange happened with over 25 million people

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Book Review: A State of Freedom by Neel Mukherjee

Desire and need, may well seem to be the two sides of the same coin. A State of Freedom by Neel Mukherjee, explores these complexities through five different characters, in five different circumstances. Reflections of contemporary India, these lives have an unquenchable thirst for a better life, as they push themselves beyond mere existence. Neel Mukherjee’s earlier published books include Past Continuous in India, which won the Crossword Prize. His second book, The Lives of Others (2014) was a shortlist for the Man Booker Prize and won the Encore Prize. A State of Freedom is Neel Mukherjee’s third novel. Sectioned into five parts,

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Book Review: Digital Marketing Insights 2017 By Social Beat

“Consumers are spoilt for choices across multi-devices and multi-channels, thus making sales competitive for marketers. As consumers become more and more digitally sound, marketers constantly feel the need to evolve and source new ways to reach their relevant audience…”–Excerpt from Digital Marketing Insights 2017 The world of digital media It hardly needs to be stressed that digital media has permanently changed the way we live, work and play. From the once simple Orkut to the more evolved news feed of Facebook and YouTube, the digital world in its new avatar has taken the world by storm. My interest in social

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Book Review Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind By Yuval Noah Harari

“Evolution has made Homo sapiens, like other social mammals, a xenophobic creature. Sapiens instinctively divides humanity into two parts, ‘we’ and ‘they’.” ― Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind. I took a considerably long time to finish this book. And there’s just one reason for this- I had to soak in every bit of it, understand every rational that was put forth, and question my very own beliefs and thought processes. The evolution of human history could be one exhilarating topic to write about. The whole subject is large, and a book on it would require a great

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Private Delhi By Ashwin Sanghi & James Patterson

The former CIA agent Jack Morgan runs an investigation agency called “Private”. With branches around the globe, the agency, investigates intriguing cases, with utmost discretion. They possess an incredible team of investigators, and boast of the latest technology and forensics to crack cases and get to the perpetrators. Continuing in this series is Private Delhi, by the popular crime fiction writer James Patterson, in collaboration with Ashwin Sanghi.  “Plastic barrels containing dissolved human remains have been found in the basement of a house. But this isn’t just any house; this property belongs to the state government. With information suppressed by

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Book Review: Veerappan-Chasing the Brigand by K Vijay Kumar

He was the man who terrorized the two southern states for over a decade. Koose Muniasamy Veerapppan, or just Veerappan, holed up in the deep vastness of the Dhimbam forest that lay over Karnataka and Tamilnadu, was once the most dreaded bandit and smuggler. The book Veerappan: Chasing the Brigand by K Vijay Kumar is an account of who exactly this man was, his deeds from sandalwood smuggling to illegal poaching, the mammoth manhunt that saw the loss of several lives, the Special Task Force, and finally Operation Cocoon, in which the bandit finally is killed. Retired IPS officer K

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Book Review: In the Name of God By Ravi Subramanian

There are lies… and there are secrets…. In an ancient temple that boasts of a strong religious faith, with a king who upholds this faith and the legend, a lot can happen in the name of God. What do you believe? Whom do you trust? What does it mean to have blind faith? In the Name of God by Ravi Subramanian, is a thriller, based on the Padmanabhaswamy Temple in Thiruvananthapuram, the assets it holds within its vaults and, the infamous controversies that arose after the Supreme Court directed a committee to open up these vaults. Packed with that adrenaline

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Lone Fox Dancing-Autobiography by Ruskin Bond

I just cannot review certain books. Surely I may sound very biased here. But, if I were to do a critical evaluation or try to assess the value of these books, it would be to undermine the author and his words. I simply cannot review Ruskin Bond and his books. I just pen down my whole experience of reading them!!!!! Ruskin Bond’s autobiography was his birthday gift to his readers in the month of June. The book Lone Fox Dancing, documents his life- from a young boy in boarding school, life in England and finally his return to India and turning

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Book Review: The Ministry of Utmost Happiness- Arundhati Roy

I wasn’t all that sure if I should actually pick Arundhati Roy’s latest- The Ministry of Utmost Happiness. The reasons were plenty. Firstly, despite all the acclaim and the Booker Prize, I hadn’t entirely enjoyed reading her first book – The God of Small Things. Secondly, her so called liberal opinions expressed on many occasions, on all things Indian, just didn’t go down well with me. And lastly, in just over a week since The Ministry of Utmost Happiness has been out, there has been a complete mix of reviews bombarding social media. Some really juicy reviews that screamed out that

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Book Review: Sita Warrior of Mithila By Amish Tripathi

The much awaited second book in the Ram Chandra Series by Amish Tripathi is finally out. Titled Sita- Warrior of Mithila, the book has come after a gap of almost two years. Let me begin by warning Amish fans, not to compare this book with the earlier Meluha series. ‘Cause if you do so, you may lose out on drawing the complete essence of the book. I had done it when I read the first in the series, “The Scion of Ikshvaku”, and somehow was left disappointed. So this time around, I decided to read it with an open mind,

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Book Review: The Scion of Ikshvaku- Amish Tripathi

“It is the perfect Land- Ram Rajya….But perfection has a price.” For those who loved the Meluha Trilogy, The Ram Chandra Series is yet another attempt by author Amish Tripathi. Months of advertising and many promotional drives later, the book was released on June 22, 2015. The book is a journey, way back in time, of India in 3400 BC. As Ayodhya is weakened, with a war that has taken a toll, the damage has been done. The people of the Sapt Sindhu descend into poverty. They need a leader to pull them out of the situation- of despondency and

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Black Friday: The True Story Of The Bombay Bomb Blasts by S.Hussain Zaidi

“Ten Explosions rocked Bombay that day, taking place with almost metronomic precision at short intervals. Between 1.28 and 3.35 p.m. bombs had gone off across Bombay, the first time any city in the world was subject to serial blasts…” -Black Friday It was the blasts that shook the nation The 1993 Bombay bombings on 12 March 1993, was a well-coordinated attack, and considered as one of the most destructive bomb explosions in India. This single day attack resulted in over 250 fatalities and over 700 injured. The mastermind behind these attacks is Dawood Ibrahim who controls the underworld syndicate D–Company.

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Me Before You-Jojo Moyes

“Me Before You” by Jojo Moyes came as the much needed refreshing read, after I had completed the “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak. I largely read soft romances, though I don’t truly consider myself a romantic person. Probably that’s why I end up picking up these books. But, Me Before You isn’t one of those books with oodles of romance. In fact, I wouldn’t even want to categorize it under this genre. Yet, it is one of those books that give an emotional tug at the heart. Louisa Clark has no great ambitions in life. Nor does she have

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The Book Thief By Markus Zusak- Review

Heard of books that feed the soul? The Book Thief may well be considered one. Let me tell you at the onset, this book isn’t for those who seek a light and quick read. Nor is it for those, who like all things bright and happy. The Book Thief is for you if you love to get right into the skin of the characters. It is for you if experimental fiction thrills you. It is for you, if you love reading about the Holocaust, even if it is something you have heard enough about. Set in Nazi Germany, it is

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The Mother I Never Knew By Sudha Murty

Last weekend I completed reading Sudha Murty’s “The mother I never knew”. A collection of two simple novellas, the book gives a peek into families and their past secrets- and how important are they in the here and now. The book presents two different men and their stories. Venkatesh the bank manager, accidently stumbles upon his father’s past and discovers an abandoned wife and child. On the other hand Mukesh, the son of a well-to-do man, discovers on his father’s death that he was actually adopted. Both men accidently uncover a past, to find a mother they never knew existed.

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