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Category: Parenting

Do You Mask Your Wound?

Do You Mask Your Wound?

My eight year old was bruised badly. Falling off the slide, the left side of her face had been scraped by the rough gravel below. Luckily the wound wasn’t very deep and required just a bit of home treatment. But the little one was upset beyond words. The swelling caused her pain when she ate or spoke.  It made her conscious too. “What if my friends laughed at the wound on my face?  I won’t go to school tomorrow”, she sobbed. Calming her down, I convinced her that hiding from people isn’t really the solution. Instead, she should tell her friends how brave she had been, to withstand the pain of the wound. The little one seemed convinced. She dared to not mask her wound!!!

How well kids accept simple solutions to life’s issues!

But growing up into adults, this ability surely seems to do the vanishing act.  Despite having given all that gyan to my eight year old, I realized the hard- hitting truth, that I had been doing just the reverse. I tend to mask my wounds. Probably not the ones visible, but the hidden emotional wounds embedded deep within the recesses of the heart.

Hidden wounds take longer to heal than physical wounds.

There is a hidden wound in almost each one of us, isn’t it? Memories that hurt, of prejudices inflicted by society, memories of abuse, ridicule, criticism or hatred. I often suppress such wounds within me, letting the anger grow inside. Seldom did I realize that by doing so, I was subconsciously never allowing the wound to heal. I was just making it worse!!!

Applying the gyan…

…I gave my little one, I reflected on healing the hidden wounds.

Speaking it out: There’s something about revealing feelings to someone you trust. It relieves a great deal of the pain, fear, anger, resentment and bitterness.

Emotions are natural: I realized there’s no point in resenting feelings. These are natural emotions and whether we like it or not, they come with an element of pain. So acknowledging them helps to effectively handle them when they arise the next time.

Face it all: Over the years I tended to avoid certain situations and kind of people with the fear of being hurt. It was more my fear that caused discomfort, than the actual situation. It is important to overcome this fear, and to do one must let go of past memories.

Emotions are part of human existence. The real strength does not lie in masking it, or pretending it does not exist, but in the courage to accept it and bear it all.

So, do you also mask your wounds?

*Featured Image Source: Pixabay

The Magic of Warmth!

The Magic of Warmth!

“A soldier doesn’t fight because he hates what is in front of him. A soldier fights because he loves what he left behind.” – Unknown

It was for the third time that we had to cancel our planned vacation. The bags lay half packed on the bed, as I looked up at his stoic face. His eyes said it all; the vacation was not going to happen for some time to come. I didn’t utter a word the entire day.

It’s overwhelming indeed!

From the time of the Great World Wars, there have been abundant discussions and dialogues’ describing what life for a soldier is like. Movies and bestsellers have well portrayed human experiences and mental outlook during difficult military deployments. However, there has been little attention on the effects these deployments have on the wife. When the man of the house is away on military operations, the family experiences significant stress, and dealing with it could be overwhelming.

The wife goes through loneliness, pressures of extensive separation, potential difficulty in bringing up children, disruption in family roles and many a times a feeling of a loss of emotional support.

I didn’t bid goodbye!

And when the unit “Husband” belongs to, decides to make last minute changes to its schedule, holidays planned with families may never see the light of the day. The air of disappointment lingered around as I sulked when the “Husband” picked up his bag to leave. It was evident- there would be a month of separation. The complex emotions were hard to counter, and I stood still without bidding him the ritual goodbye I had been doing so for the last decade.

Loneliness- When kids weave a magic to overcome it

I sat that night on my bed, looking outside the window. The vast expanse of the night created a deeper sense of loneliness. As I propped up my pillow, I felt my 8 year old’s hands moving through my hair. They felt warm as she gently massaged drops of oil with her tiny fingers. Children have this uncanny sense of understanding, of feelings that are seldom spoken. They are better able to comprehend what is not expressed in words and gestures, but what is evident in facial expressions.

Sensing my mood, she felt it right to just give me-her mother- a touch of warmth, hoping it would smooth things over.

I let her move her little hands through my hair, as the warm coconut oil sooth my temples. I closed my eyes. Maybe I was being unreasonable. Being married to the man in uniform, my life is a jumble of both joyous and lonely moments. And it is best I take one day at a time. Well, I wasn’t sure if it was the warmth of the oil or her tiny fingers that brought about this realization to me.

It was a magic of warmth moment indeed!!!!!

“I’m blogging about my #MagicOfWarmth moment at BlogAdda in association with Parachute Advansed Hot Oil

 

*Featured image source: Pixabay
Clash of the Titans: The Mother-in-Law & Daughter-in-law

Clash of the Titans: The Mother-in-Law & Daughter-in-law

Pbar_ww_badegeut a group of young women in a room, and you are bound to have at least seventy percent of them rant about their mother-in-laws. From time immemorial this relationship has been the butt of all jokes. Scores of forums across the internet are flooded on a daily basis, with questions pertaining to tackling the Mother-in-law. Often conflicts turn bitter, and may well become the reason for many a marriage to crumble down.

The Modern Day Mother In-law & Daughter-in-law

The modern-day Mother-in- law, is far more educated than what her own Mother-in-law was. From the personification of pure dominance, today, she is a more sensitive individual. She is more suited to treat her daughter-in-law with respect as she has learnt that to get respect, one must give respect. The Daughter-in-law of today is independent and is well aware of her rights. She believes in equality and thrives on mutual respect. She is receptive and is open to expressing not only her feelings, but her views too.

“Yet, despite these changes, there seems to be no end to the conflicts between a Mother-in-law and Daughter-in-law.”

The Clash of the Titans

I consider myself lucky, to belong to the small percentage of women, for whom, the Mother-in-law factor isn’t really a big issue. Of course, we have had our share of differences too. But over the years, we have managed to settle down these differences amicably.

You’re the daughter she never had, is what it all begins with. And well, you do assume that this purely means she’s going to be supportive of all your choices, staying out of your life and marriage, just being there at the time, when you ask her for help. Looks perfect, isn’t it!! On the other hand, the Mom-in-law has her own little picture of what the Daughter-in-law must encompass. She knows you are crazy about her son. But she also assumes that you see her as an authority on her son. She assumes, you would seek advice from her, and the end result, she can’t wait to start helping…

What ensues is the clash of the Titans, and the reason why women begin to discuss how strained or infuriating their relationship with their Mother-in law has become.

Tracing the Problem

The problems can be traced back to the unspoken yet conflicting expectations and assumptions. For the Daughter-in-law, no matter how modern is the Mother-in-law, she is constantly judged on the standards of a traditional housewife– which is her ability to cook, maintain a home clean, and raise children. On the other hand, for the Mother-in-Law, her decade old pattern of decision-making is suddenly under threat, as the daughter-in-law now likes to do it all her way.

There is, thus, an underlying disappointment felt by both women, giving rise to a distinctive negativity. Add to this, a mother’s possessiveness over her son and a wife’s difficulty as she balances work and home responsibilities. You have the perfect formula for years of trouble. These tensions do more than cause friction within families. They can put even the best marriages at risk.

The Solutions Lies Within Both

As long as there is no abuse, there surely is a solution in tackling this age-old problem. By abuse I mean, dowry harassment, physical, mental and verbal abuse, irrespective of who inflicts it on whom. When such issues arise, there should surely be no compromise and it is not to be tolerated.

“Love begets love; let it once begin and none can tell its end.”

For the mother-in-law, who may feel her domain threatened, must accept that the son is now the object of  his wife’s affection too. Don’t pin down expectations. The mantra is to forgive and forget without any animosity against your son’s bride.

For the daughter-in-law, remember she comes with years of experience. Do not take offense at the smallest of things. Give a relationship time. If your mother-in-law expresses a view that differs from yours, you don’t have to accept it in entirety. Show respect for her experience and at the same time, make it clear that you want to do things your own way.

What surely worked for me is the assurance I gave my mother-in-law that she would continue to be respected, and be an integral part of the family. It made her respect our boundaries, which she seldom crossed over.

For the man of the house, you may feel like as though you are between a rock and a hard place, with a possessive mom on one side and a sensitive wife on the other. But remember you are the link between the two. Either you ease out the tension with your calm and collected way or, simply allow the tension to mount by being a silent spectator.

Featured Image Source: India Opines
What exactly do aging parents want from their children?

What exactly do aging parents want from their children?

met him at a social gathering. Hunched upon his walking stick, his eyes followed nothing but his son’s footsteps. An aging parent he was, and at the age of eighty, all that he cared about was having his son around him.

I have often found myself in conversations with people, where the discussion reels around, what exactly children need from their parents. As a young parent, my answer always boils down to the most critical thing – every good parent must build on a framework of providing, nurturing and guiding their young children. But here is something else I have noticed. Very rarely, have I been drawn into a discussion on what exactly my parents need from me. Apart from being a parent to young children, I also happen to be an “adult child” of aging parents. As much as I love having them around me, there have been moments when their antics drive me up the wall. I have never really given this much thought, until recently.

At a social gathering, I met the octogenarian. A retired Botany professor he was, and lived with his son and grandchildren. I, in fact, consider him lucky to have them all around him, unlike many other elderly people who live on their own. Yet, I noticed that tinge of loneliness in his eyes. As I walked up to him that evening, he held my hand. The grip was tight, yet warm. He spoke. And when he did, it was like as though the floodgates had been opened. His reminiscence, of his good old days- the life he led, the work he did and the love in his heart for his children. I realized, all that this man wanted was to be heard, to be held and to feel a warm touch. He probably did get them all from his family. But, his age demanded them more frequently.

So, what exactly do aging parents want from their children?

As parents get older, there is a certain element of assurance that they seek very frequently from their children. It is often demanded, and I would blame it on a degree of insecurity, that seeps through most people due to the natural process of growing old. The problem lies in the fact that, though they want to be cared about, there is a fear of being cared for.

Confusing indeed!

Where on one hand they enjoy the company of their children, they also find themselves looking for excuses to see them less often. They may be annoyed by their children’s over-protectiveness, but at the same time do appreciate the concern expressed. It’s a confusing stage for them too.

So if you tell your dad not to dig up the garden, you assume that he’ll listen. It’s the sensible thing to do. But his response would be to go out and shovel away. It’s a way of holding on to a life that seems to be slipping back. It’s a complex situation where there is a strong desire for both autonomy and connection in relations with their adult children, leading to ambivalence about receiving assistance from them.

It is this parental stubbornness that acts as a complicating factor in inter-generational relationships. As adult children, we are more likely to say parents were acting stubborn. But the fact is, it is the scariest thing of old age, where the elderly, don’t feel in control anymore. And that’s when the conflict arises. We, as the middle-aged adult, are worried about the aging parent. However, the parent is both annoyed by that and feels more loved too.

The issue may be complex, however, the solution is fairly simple. By understanding why parents may be insisting, resisting, or persisting in their ways or opinions, could lead to better communication. As I live my life, with a myriad of complexities of growing old, I realize, it’s better to not pick arguments. I prefer to not make a parent feel defensive. It is best to plant an idea, step back, and bring it up later. The key is to be patient.

When The Last Right is Not For Daughters

When The Last Right is Not For Daughters

Tamil Nadu Chief Minister Jayalalitha was laid to rest at Marina Beach in Chennai. Her close aide Sasikala performed the last rites before her body was lowered into the earth. I watched it in entirety on national television. But why am I talking about this when this post isn’t about Tamil Nadu politics or its vendetta? It’s because…. I saw a woman out there performing the last rites!!!!

Hinduism prescribes a whole set of rules and regulations that have been passed on from generations, with a sole idea of having some sort of orderliness in our complex human life. Some of these rules make sense while many others could simply be termed superstitious.

When my father passed away a few years back, the entire responsibility of giving him that final farewell fell on my sister and my shoulders. From arranging a Hindu priest, to booking the timing and slot for cremation at the graveyard, the two of us managed to pull the whole thing. Yet, at the time when the last rites were to be performed, the priest politely told us to stay away and instead, another male member of the family was asked to step in. I wasn’t too happy with this, yet at that moment, so overwhelmed was I with emotions on my father dying, I refrained from arguing with the family around.

Till date, I regret doing this.

The importance of the male relative performing the last rites comes from the Garuda Purana, one of the eighteen Puranas which are part of the Hindu body of texts. To me, this rule or tradition, whatever you may choose to call it, denies the right of the woman over her parents. For a very long time, I tried making sense of why was it alright for another male member to perform the last rites, but not the daughter. And after considerable reading and speaking to many who were well-versed with the scriptures, I learnt that:

The scriptures mention women as soft hearted emotional beings. Thus extreme grief could be overwhelming and handling rituals related to it may take a toll on them. It is for this very reason, women are often forbidden from entering the cremation ground. The scriptures emphasize on purity in every ritual performed. And mensuration has always been considered impure. As such cycles could hinder the course of the ritual being performed; women were kept away from it in entirety. Some scholars are also of the view that this rule was added to the scriptures to prevent women from demanding paternal property. In our patriarchal society, a woman, once married, belonged to the husband’s family. Exempting women from performing last rites of parents would ensure that they have no rights or legal claim on their parents’ property. A few other scholars, state that though the Puranas do not mention a daughter’s role, it does not expressly forbid them from doing so.

The Changing Trends

But do these traditions & practices seem relevant in today’s times? For years now, this has been under constant debate. In fact there have been cases in the last few years where daughters have come ahead and performed the last rites of their parents.  Renuka Choudhury, the fiery congress leader, performed the last rites of her father, being the only child. When Gopinath Munde was cremated, his last rites were performed by his daughter and political heir, Pankaja Munde. The traditional notions of the role of a son in his parents’ last rites must erode away, and we must welcome a new set of practices that are suitable to the world we are living in today.

As a society we collectively need to understand that many traditions and practices were perfect for the time they were made for. Like the process of evolution, our thoughts and ideas must evolve to newer forms, to mold itself into the changing patterns of society.

Parenting Alone? It’s No Easy Job

Parenting Alone? It’s No Easy Job

    I pretend to have all the energy in the world, when all that I want to do is hit the bed…. It’s no easy job parenting alone!

It isn’t uncommon these days, to find spouses living in two different places. The reasons may be many- better career prospects or children’s’ education. In such cases, the children end up being with one of the parent, meeting the other over long weekends or vacations. In my case, the husband being in the armed forces, is constantly away for long spells, leaving me and the kids to manage on our own in what I call our little mad home. So for my two little children I am their single parent (well, I shall ignore the parenting on the telephone done by the hubby).

So what’s the big deal here? Why does this take a toll on me?

I am charged 24/7

So here I am the super mom, charged up and on call 24/7. Of course most moms are on some sort of red alert through the day when it comes to their child’s needs. But hey think about managing the show single-handedly with no help whatsoever, making those daily small decisions on your own too. I am up and about, showing up at all school functions. I cart around them and their playmates on every single day of the week. I am the nurse, the cheer leader, the counselor, the cook; well the list just goes on…

I plan; really… even before the previous one is executed

Did you just think about planning the meals for the day? Oh wait there’s more. Like the craft activity for the younger one that involves paper quilling. And what did the older one want? A play date with her friend. What about the cycling session with both of them? Yes, that’s what I do all the time. The mind seems to be occupied, juggling various little plans.

Where did those 24 hours go?

The hours are just not enough in a day. Damn! The newspaper still hasn’t been read. Never mind, in a few hours the next day’s paper would be at the door.

Frustrations? What do they look like?

I sat with that hot cup of coffee, soaking in every bit of the aroma. The younger one decides to squeal. I rush to see what it was all about, only to realize that her little pony tail lay open. I head back to my coffee and as the first few sips go down my throat, the sound from the kid’s room doesn’t seem all too fine. I pretend to be calm, as I pull them apart after their violent fight of bites and scratches. A few minutes of consoling and I head back to my coffee which now is sans the yummy froth and aroma. Frustrated? Naah you wouldn’t spot them on my brow.

When does the day end?

And despite the tiring day, every single day, I find time to read them a bedtime story, and tuck them into bed. Bliss!!!!! The kids are asleep, the house is silent. I sit down and all I want to do is talk to someone.

Oh wait! There’s no one around!! Sigh!!

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To Rent a Womb- The New Surrogacy Bill in India

To Rent a Womb- The New Surrogacy Bill in India

Let me begin by telling you a story- the story of Baby Manji. She was born in the summer of 2008, to a surrogate mother- using the sperm of a Japanese man and an egg from an unknown source (reportedly a Nepali/Indian). But even before she was born, her parents had decided to part ways. The wife who wasn’t genetically linked to the baby didn’t want her, and the husband whose sperm was used to create the embryo, wanted the baby. The actual twist, however, came after her birth.

It was a catch 22 situation where Indian rules required the child to be legally adopted before leaving the country, but barred single men from adopting. And Japanese law didn’t recognize surrogacy. Hence Manji’s Japanese father was denied travel documents for the baby. In the months to follow, Baby Manji kicked up a storm and after a prolonged legal battle, the story ended well. Manji got her Japanese visa to leave India.

surrogacy-difficult-to-implement

Surrogacy isn’t really a new practice in the country. Don’t we have mythological references where Yashoda played mother to Krishna, though, Devki and Vasudev were the biological parents? In the last decade, India has been a leader and a sought after destination in surrogacy-related fertility tourism, due to the relatively low cost, with costs being roughly a third of the price compared to a procedure in the UK. We have here altruistic surrogacy, in which no charges or monetary incentive of any kind is involved. We also have commercial surrogacy which has been legally permitted since 2002, by way of giving monetary incentive in cash or kind, to the surrogate mother or her dependents or representative.

Years after Baby Manji was born, a new surrogacy regulation bill has been passed in India. But does it really answer all our questions?

The new bill would now not support commercial surrogacy, and a proposed new law would allow surrogacy only for Indian couples and not foreigners. It also bars single parents, homosexuals, live-in couples and, married woman who has at least one child of her own. Henceforth, only infertile couples who have been married for at least five years can seek a surrogate and, the surrogate must be a close relative. This bill has yet again brought the whole issue of surrogacy into limelight, with many being critical of it. Infertility specialists are of the opinion that such a law could lead to an illegal surrogacy industry. And things could just get more difficult for infertile couples for whom assisted reproductive technology provides hope. What if both the partners are single child? Whom would they turn to for a surrogate?

As a general practice and this is across the globe, we consider the woman giving birth to a child as the legal mother. But in surrogacy, the intended parents are to be recognized as the legal parents from birth, by virtue of the fact that the surrogate has signed a contract to hand over the child on birth to the commissioned parents. Not many countries in the world consider/recognize surrogacy. Luckily India is one of those few countries which recognizes surrogacy and considers the Intended/ Commissioning Parent/s as the legal parents.

I have often found the social aspects surrounding surrogacy to be complex. Well, mostly unsettled too. Various questions crop up in my mind- Who is a mother? Who is a father? Are there changes to the core definition of family? If so, is this progress?

If we do consider ourselves progressive, I wonder why many in our society aren’t in favour of adoption over surrogacy. Why is it still important to have some sort of genetic link to the child they are bringing into their lives?

I wonder why!!

*Featured Image Source: www.newsx.com

Promises I Keep

Promises I Keep

“Every sunset brings the promise of a new dawn.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

Our lives are filled with promises. Promises of every kind. Conditional, unconditional, unsaid, or understood. Whatever you call it they are a sort of assurance that we give to either ourselves or to another person. 

My life isn’t any different. I make a zillion promises of different kinds almost every day. Take for example, a pinkie promise to my little girl. For those who aren’t aware, a pinkie promise is the entwining of the little fingers when you assure the other person of something. Ah well! for my little girl it is always to do with getting something in return for having done a task. So in a day, I make many such promises. Some I keep, some I forget- or I rather choose to forget.

Then there are promises that I make to myself. A promise to live well, a promise to work hard at a passion, a promise to lead a more disciplined life. And do I keep these promises? Most of them I suppose.

pinky-swear

Surprisingly the promises that I seldom break are the ones that are actually unsaid. I often wonder why. Maybe because these are the ones that give me the most joy. Then I wonder why they are unsaid. These are the promises I make to my spouse- to be a good companion. A promise to my daughter that I would be there for her always, when she is in need of me. A promise to my mother that I would always be her support. A promise to the country I belong to that I would be a good citizen. 

Life is full of promises the list could go on and on. I sometimes wonder what would this world of ours be if not for these promises.

So of all the promises in your life, which is the one that you seldom break and why? Think about it.

barathon

 

 

Joys of Monsoon Robbed?

Joys of Monsoon Robbed?

“Hey it’s raining”, I announced to my kiddo.

“It’s time to splash and have some fun, because monsoons are joyous times and makes childhood memorable. We love the smell of wet mud, and sail paper boats in water puddles. Or maybe we could play football in the rain. How about sharing that single umbrella and taking a walk down the lane, jumping into every puddle we comes across? Let’s spot a rainbow as the sun peeps through the clouds or step outside to open our arms and dance with glee. Its monsoon time and let’s be silly and do childish things.”

Alas, this is all nothing but wishful thinking!!!!

Come monsoons, and every year, hundreds of cases of dengue are reported across India. The most notorious numbers were reported in Delhi last year. The National Capital saw over 15,000 cases in 2015, by far the capital’s worst outbreak in recent years.  The year also saw a high mortality rate for dengue with 38 deaths. And among those inflicted with this deadly virus last year, were my two little girls. Luckily, they fought the virus back and turned out recovered pretty soon. Yet, that fear lurks in me that things could have got worse. 

rainy-season-umbrella-small

I sometimes feel sorry for the children of today. Not only are they heavily burdened with activities and academics, the outdoor activities also seem to have reduced due to the fear of falling ill. We today live in cities that are populated, and the environment may not entirely be healthy for an active mind and growing body. Children today are bereft of these simple pleasures of monsoon showers.

As a young girl, years back, I would love the monsoons. I would listen to their sound, watch the water lashing on the pavement and smell the wet mud. I would run out with my friends once the rain stopped, armed with paper boats. We would jump on puddles splashing water on each other. No longer would I be able to give my daughter a childhood such as this. I would think a hundred times before I could let my little one, float that paper boat in the tiny muddy stream by the roadside. I would hesitate to let her jump in puddles…

Small joys of monsoon robbed?

barathon

It Doesn’t Matter if Those Tiny Shoes Are Blue or Pink!

It Doesn’t Matter if Those Tiny Shoes Are Blue or Pink!

“Phir se ladki hui he!”(You have given birth to a girl again). This was the first thing I heard, when my second child was born. The duty nurse walked in and placed her by my side. I was exhausted after the long labor and was bleeding excessively. I glanced at her, all pink and tiny, when a single tear drop slipped down my eye. I was happy. My baby was just fine.

Hubby and I were elated when we realized that our second bundle of joy was on its way. The nine months seemed too long for us three- and my first born just couldn’t wait to include her yet-to-arrive sibling, in her game of Barbie dolls. However, the elders in the family seemed a wee bit stressed. It began with subtle hints and soon moved to more direct ones that this time around, the baby better be a boy!

Hubby and I seldom paid any heed to these words, as the reasons seemed absolutely absurd to us. “You already have a girl,” they would say, “and another one would simply be an additional responsibility.”

Their want of a boy stemmed from the following thoughts.

  • With the number of rape and eve teasing around, there is an additional responsibility of protection of the girl. One always has to be on tenterhooks when they go out.
  • Continuing the family name and the task of doing karma is on the shoulders of the son.

Brushing away this absurdity, in our own privacy, hubby and I would draw up a list of names- both for boys and girls. It didn’t matter to us- whether those tiny shoes were blue or pink!

baby-shoes-1514007_960_720

On a cold winter night in Delhi, my second one was born in the Base hospital in Delhi Cantt.., when the duty nurse loudly made the announcement that it was a girl again. I gave her a meek grin at that moment, out of exhaustion. The elders in the family hardly had anything to say. The celebration was kept minimal and the air of disappointment was evident.

Back in the gyneac ward, as hubby and I sat admiring the new one, the duty nurse walked in and asked me if I was happy. Of course I was! What more could I ask for. My family, all of four, was complete now. She chuckled as she said,” You would be coming back a third time!! I have seen the world.” We both sat gazing at the door, when the intensity of her statement actually hit us.

This is probably the story in many households in our country, where a boy is preferred over a girl child, more so when it is the second time around. And this thought process is prevalent in every strata of society- doesn’t matter whether they are educated or not, doesn’t matter if they are in their 30s or in their 60s.

I probably consider myself lucky that my husband belongs to a generation where the gender of the child absolutely did not matter. I also consider myself lucky that despite the disappointment; the elders in the family came in terms with it and today are absolutely adorable grandparents to both my girls.

Yet, things are not the same for many other women in our country.  A girl child could actually spell doom for them, especially if the first born is already one.

Social campaigns have played a major role in changing mindsets and reduced the stigma attached to giving birth to a girl. Still the birth of a baby boy is accompanied by celebrations and the arrival of a baby girl elicits mixed reactions. What really needs to happen is a change at the grass root level, where we need to evolve new thought processes and advocate these to our next generation. It is only then, would we actually stop bothering, about those tiny shoes being pink or blue!

I shall leave you with a video that speaks volumes about the existing thought process. Brilliantly made by “Grey India”.

barathon